Quick Facts About The Division Of Administrative Hearings (DOAH)

The Administration Commission, consisting of the governor and the cabinet, appoints a director to head DOAH, and the appointee must be confirmed by the Senate. The director serves as DOAH’s chief judge and can appoint a deputy chief judge. The chief judge and the deputy chief judge have administrative duties and conduct formal hearings.  The…

Details

What Types Of Cases Are Heard By The Division Of Administrative Hearings (DOAH)?

DOAH judges preside over a variety of cases that impact the entire state of Florida, one or more regions of Florida, or cases that can substantially impact the lives of particular individuals.  For example, DOAH judge hears cases involving employment discrimination, licensure discipline involving numerous professions, environmental and land use disputes, exceptional education disputes, Baker…

Details

How Long Do I Have To File A Lawsuit?

The length of time you have to file a lawsuit varies by the type of case (Chapter 95, Fla. Stat.). If you have a possible claim or want to file a lawsuit, consult an attorney as soon as possible to protect your rights. The Florida Bar and local bar associations operate lawyer referral services to…

Details

Do I Need An Attorney To File A Civil Case In Court?

An attorney is not required for an individual to file a case in court. If the claim is based on a written document, you should bring it with you when you file a claim. The court clerk’s office has simple forms for you to complete if the amount involved is less than $15,000. However, it…

Details

Quick Facts About the Florida Supreme Court

There are seven Supreme Court justices and each is appointed by the governor from a list of nominated qualified attorneys. Each justice must be an attorney for ten years in good standing with the Florida Bar. A justice may serve until the mandatory retirement age of 70. The governor must appoint a justice from each…

Details

What Types Of Cases Are Heard By The Florida Supreme Court?

The Florida Supreme Court’s jurisdiction is limited by the Florida Constitution. This means it can only decide certain kinds of cases. The court must review final orders imposing death sentences, decide cases involving the discipline of attorneys, review district court decisions declaring a Florida statute or provision of the Florida Constitution unconstitutional, bond validations, certain…

Details

Quick Facts About the DCA

There are five district courts of appeal throughout the state. District court judges are appointed by the governor from a list of nominated qualified attorneys; each must be an attorney for five years in good standing with The Florida Bar and an elector (resident) of the district where he or she is to serve. District…

Details

What Types Of Cases Are Heard By The District Courts Of Appeal?

Each court can hear appeals from final judgments of lower courts, it can review certain nonfinal orders, and by general law it has the power to review final actions taken by state agencies. Additionally each district court has the authority to issue extraordinary writs as necessary to perform its duties.

Quick Facts About the Circuit Court

A circuit court judge must be an attorney for five years, in good standing with The Florida Bar, an elector (resident) of the county where he or she is to serve, and is usually elected by the public to serve a six year term. A circuit court judge may be re-elected.

What Types Of Cases Are Heard By The Circuit Court?

Cases involving felony criminal offenses (which are punishable by fines and/or prison of at least 1 year and 1 day), matters involving the property of a person who has died (probate), guardianships, juvenile matters for those under age 18, civil cases where the amount claimed is more than $15,000, divorces and most actions involving real…

Details

Quick Facts About the County Court

A county court judge must be an attorney for five years (except if the population is less than 40,000 in that county) in good standing with The Florida Bar, an elector (resident) of the county where he or she is to serve, and is usually elected by the public to serve a six year term.…

Details

What Types Of Cases Are Considered By The County Courts?

Cases involving misdemeanor criminal offenses (which are punishable by fines and/or county jail up to one year), traffic offenses and civil cases where the amount claimed is under $15,000 are handled in the county court. Disputes under $5,000 are handled in the small claims division of the county court (§ 34.01, Fla. Stat.).

What Are Florida’s Various Courts?

Courts in Florida are divided into county courts, administrative courts, circuit courts, district courts of appeal, and the Florida Supreme Court. Trials are held in county courts, administrative courts, and circuit courts. If a party believes a trial court decided a case in error, he or she may ask that the case be reviewed by…

Details